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Our concerts for 2024

This page shows our anticipated concert series for 2024. Details of performers, the musical offerings and program notes can be accessed (as they become available) by clicking on the concert series title.

Of course program changes beyond our control may occur from time to time. Please join our mail or email list to have the current program details sent to you or view this page regularly.

Tickets:

$35, concession $30 and students $10 (new prices for 2024).

Available online via TryBooking when a button is displayed, or at the door.

April

Grace & Meriel

Fri 12 Apr, 11:00am
Home Hill Winery*
Ranelagh


Sat 13 Apr, 2:00pm
LifeWay Baptist Church
Devonport


Sun 14 Apr, 2:00pm
Holy Trinity Church
Launceston

August

Hartz Trio

Sat 3 Aug, 2:00pm
LifeWay Baptist Church
Devonport


Sun 4 Aug, 2:00pm
Holy Trinity Church
Launceston


Mon 5 Aug, 11:00am
Home Hill Winery*
Ranelagh

November

Nick & Phoebe

Fri 22 Nov, 11:00am
Home Hill Winery*
Ranelagh


Sat 23 Nov, 2:00pm
LifeWay Baptist Church
Devonport


Sun 24 Nov, 2:00pm
Holy Trinity Church
Launceston

* Why not make a day of it; stay and enjoy a meal. Booking essential so please contact the venue direct:

  • Home Hill Winery 6242 1897

In Memory of Jo St Leon

We are delighted to bring you two string sextets - combining the intimacy of a string quartet with the fuller sound of a larger ensemble. Performing are Jennifer Owen and Lucy Carrig-Jones, violin, Douglas Coghill and Ariel Postmus, viola, Jonathan Békés, cello and Stuart Thompson, double bass.

And here they are (L-R): Jonathan Békés, Lucy Carrig-Jones, Ariel Postmus, Jennifer Owen, Stuart Thompson and Douglas Coghill.

Program Notes (Robert Gibson, Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, © 2024)

Borodin
String sextet in D minor
I. Allegro II. Andante

The illegitimate son of a Russian prince and his mistress, Aleksandr Borodin (1833-1887) showed musical aptitude from a young age but was equally passionate about science, enrolling in medical school in St Petersburg before the age of 17 and graduating ‘with exceptional distinction’ five years later. Henceforth, music remained a side activity – both as a composer and performer (he was an amateur cellist) – while he established his name as a scientist, becoming a professor of chemistry around the age of 30. Borodin was in his late 20s (and living and studying in Germany) when he composed the work performed in this concert, the String Sextet in D minor. Of the sextet’s original four movements, only the first two survive. Lightness and clarity characterise the first movement, Allegro. The opening theme, in D minor, leads to a lyrical second theme in F, where the violin melody is set against a plucked string (pizzicato) accompaniment. The Andante, in the key of E minor, is in the style of a slow march. Take note of the mournful melody heard at the outset as it pervades the entire movement.

Brahms
String sextet No 1 in B-flat, Op 18
I. Allegro ma non troppo II. Andante ma moderato III. Scherzo: Allegro molto IV. Rondo: Poco allegretto e grazioso

Borodin and Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) were exact contemporaries but it appears that their paths never crossed. Interestingly, both were working on string sextets at the same time, Brahms completing his Sextet No 1 in 1860, around the same time that Borodin commenced his. That said, Brahms takes an altogether grander view of working with the six-piece ensemble. Rather than focusing on ‘lightness and clarity’, Brahms’s preference is for a darker overall sound. He favours middle and low registers and fills in non-melodic parts with densely textured figuration. The principal theme of the opening movement, Allegro ma non troppo, which is introduced by the cello, moves mostly by step. Brahms adds interest by undercutting the 3/4 time signature with what appear to be diversions into 2/4 (this kind of metrical ‘trick’ is one of his stylistic fingerprints). Brahms rolls out one thematic idea after another in the expansive opening movement, sometimes venturing into remote and surprising keys. As ever with this composer, meticulous attention to detail keeps the musical argument taught and convincing. As in the Borodin sextet, the second movement is a slow march in the minor mode (D minor in this case). It is in theme and variations form, with Viola I taking a leading role in introducing the theme (echoed by Violin I). Other instruments come to the fore in the succeeding variations, which mostly remain in D minor but for a breakout episode in D major which brings a welcome change of mood and intensity. The Scherzo has a cheerful, somewhat rustic air with Brahms once again playing metrical ‘tricks’ by using melodic shape and phrase to subvert the 3/4 time signature. No such ambiguity undermines the bold and straightforward trio section, which runs at a clip. Surprisingly, the sextet ends not with a fleet-footed finale but a moderately fast and graceful movement. The tempo picks up in the last minute, leading to a radiant finish.